Plastic pollution in the oceans

The pollution of the oceans by the concentration of plastics is increasing rapidly and alarmingly. In global figures, during the period from 1950 to 2015, 9% of discarded plastics were recycled. Twelve per cent were incinerated and 79 per cent ended up in landfills and the environment.

In our bodies

The latest report on human intake of plastics suggests that people are consuming about 2,000 microplastics per week. That's roughly the equivalent of the weight of a credit card.

Should we worry?

They absorb bacteria and pollutants that enter our bodies. In addition to these pathogens, they possess compounds that are harmful to health, including so-called endocrine disruptors. Substances that alter the hormonal balance of organisms.

The Canary Islands, a specially affected region

The Trade Winds and the Canary Current, the phenomena that make our islands a paradise for marine and land life, are the ones that expose us to a huge amount of plastics from other parts of the planet. Therefore, not only are we not exempt from suffering the consequences of the abuse of plastic in our daily lives, but we are especially exposed to them.

What can we do?

We have to change our behaviour, and also invest in improving the plastic collection and recycling systems. In addition, to raise awareness among all the Canary Islanders. Change begins at the base.

How it affects us

This problem affects our ocean beds, our marine life and also our diet. Canary Island seafood suffers the consequences of this increase in microplastics, which we then eat at our table.

Who we are

The answer lies not only in removing plastics from nature.

In May 2018 we created this project that has become an NGO with the aim of reducing the environmental impact of plastics in the Canary Islands and the rest of the world. Our intention is very clear: we want to encourage thinking about what we are doing with our planet and how we could change.

We know that a transition towards a new sustainable economy will be a complex process. In this sense, both society and the business community in the Canary Islands must urgently adopt the measures that the Canary Islands Government will implement to comply with the laws that will soon be approved in the field of the environment and climate change.

The speed of implementation and the adaptability of all these measures will be crucial in order to join the new trends without weakening the economy of the Canary Islands.

About us


Luis Valien

“I have always enjoyed and loved the Ocean. I realized how bad the situation is, and decided to do something about it. Becoming part of the answer.”

Ignacio Fernández de la Puente

“I started this project because of my aspiration to be the change I hope to see in the world.”

#Bailaporelmar

From Canarias Libre de Plásticos we have launched this beautiful project, ‘Dance for the sea’, to make a campaign of participation with NGOs, companies and individuals to stop the consequences of plastics in the Spanish ecosystems.

Discover the campaign

Many are joining forces against this problem

We must understand that this is a serious worldwide problem. The scientific community, the United Nations and countless organizations around the world are working daily to put an end to this colossal challenge.

Our achievements

Our numbers

We have a clear resolve of our actions, carried out with true enthusiasm and entrepreneurial spirit. Thanks to this and the help of many people, we have succeeded:


+45

Beach cleanups

+2.000

Volunteers

82.000L

plastics removed from our environment

10.000

have attended our talks and workshops